Home > Uncategorized > List of 1,300 Alledged Undocumented Residents Released In Utah

List of 1,300 Alledged Undocumented Residents Released In Utah

In Utah, hackers or undisclosed state employees have sent an anonymous letter to government officials containing the names, addresses and other personal data of 1,300 residents they claim are illegal immigrants.

The list initially was sent in April to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Salt Lake City. The same list or one updated with additional names was sent earlier this week to state and local agencies and some news outlets.

“We ask that you remember who you work for in this country — you work for America and for the citizens in the state of Utah. You DO NOT work for illegal immigrants who have come into our country illegally and who now take advantage of our system,” it said. “They need to go — and go now.”

The Utah state legislature next session is scheduled to consider an immigration bill similar to the one passed by Arizona that goes into effect July 29.

Paul Murphy, a spokesman for the attorney general’s office, said the letter came from information in a database for the Department of Workforce Services, which collects information on unemployment benefits, food stamps, Medicaid and other government programs.

According to the Los Angeles Times:

“These people [who distributed the list] are very interested in making sure that we disclose the names of people they think are breaking the law. I think it’s only fair that they disclose who they are, and tell us why they didn’t break the law,” (Murphy said.)

Intentionally disclosing a private record or gaining access to such a record under false pretenses could be prosecuted as a Class B misdemeanor, punishable by up to six months in jail, Murphy said. “It could be as much as a third-degree felony, meaning up to five years in prison, if the custodian of the records actually stole the records,” he added.

Federal authorities also are examining the list because, in some cases, it contained Social Security numbers, said Jonathan Lasher, assistant inspector general for external relations for the federal Social Security Administration.

The letter has set off a panic in Latino communities. “People wanting to know if they’re on the list. Should they move to another state? Should they leave the country? Horrified, scared, whatever language you can put on it,” said Tony Yapias, director of the advocacy group Proyecto Latino de Utah.

Yapias said some of those whose names appear on the list have been confirmed as legal residents. He said there are fears the list could reach extremists who might use it to intimidate or harass those on the list.

Gov. Herbert announced several weeks ago that he wants a  diverse group of Utahns to set down and discuss the state’s immigration problems. He says he wants a solution by Utahns for Utahns. Some planning to participate in the summit are legislators writing law similar to Arizona, leaders who don’t agree with the approach as it  forces racial profiling  members of the Latino community and local law enforcement.

What is happening in Utah is advocacy by intimidation.

Those who want the government to enforce immigration laws do not have the guts — as Republican Gov. Gary Herbert implied on Thursday when he announced the internal investigation — and hide behind a cloak of secrecy.

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EPILOGUE

In all protest movements, the end justifies the means. In this case, a crime of violating confidentiality with the possible intent to inflict bodily harm, is despicable. Committing one crime to enforce another and doing it anonymously is the act of cowards.

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